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Sunday, July 05, 2015

The Inevitability of Change

Image result for royal poinciana trees    Image result for frigate bird



          Image result for southernmost point key west



Image result for everglades     Image result for florida keys sunset pictures


It's easy to take something for granted when you've experienced it so many times and I suppose I'd gotten rather blase about the Florida Keys. I've been there often since my kids have lived there so many years. But this time, I took my friend, Brenda, so I got to see it through new eyes and that helped me appreciate southern Florida all over again.

When we left Indiana, it had been gloomy and gray and rainy for so long, we longed for sun and warmth and riotous color and we found all that in the Keys. Brenda got to see many firsts - the weirdly twisted gumbo limbo trees, Frigate birds like flying Batman logos high in the sky, the Royal Poinciana trees in full spectacular bloom, the vast sweep of the Everglades, the incredible Keys sunsets, the southernmost point of the United States.

Beyond my daughter-in-law's pier are a line of mangrove islands that create a kind of protected harbor between them and the seawall. Many boats, extremely upscale cruisers and yachts and sail boats, anchor out there. We'd go out each night to sit on the benches at the end of the dock to watch day turn into night. The boat people have a tradition of blowing conch shells in tribute to the sun as it falls below the horizon leaving shades of tangerine and fuchsia and scarlet and gold behind. It is an eerie, otherworldly sound.

During the day, we admired the blooming bougainvillea spilling down the sides of fences and watched pelicans and seagulls cruising above. Sometimes, we spied an iguana and other smaller lizards. Sitting on Lisa's balcony, we heard the rustling of the graceful coconut palms and palmettos.

We drove to Key West one day over the Seven-Mile bridge where the waters swirled in hues of royal blue and emerald, turquoise and sage under a powder blue sky. We ate grouper and shrimp po'boys and sandwiches mounded high with barbequed pork.

It was exactly what I needed to find a new lease on life after John's death. The vivid colors and hot sun and plants and animals so different than what we're used to at home encouraged me to acknowledge that life isn't static but filled with constant change. There is nothing to do but accept it and move on to see what good can be found in what comes next.



2 comments:

Liz Flaherty said...

Such hard things to learn, but it must be beautiful down there. We always talk about going there, but haven't yet.

Vicki Williams said...

Put it on your bucket list! It is almost like a different country once you leave the mainland.