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Sunday, October 08, 2017

Are You A Non-Writer?

                                                      Image result for writer's block

I taught writing classes for several years. I tried to encompass the basics of marketing as well as the writing itself. I really enjoyed those classes and I think the attendees enjoyed them too. The sad fact was though. that with a few exceptions, most of my students were non-writers of one type or another.

First, we had the Dreamers. They visualize seeing their name in print, maybe their book will even be made into a movie, but when it comes to sitting down at the keyboard, they realize they don't have much to say. I had one student tell me, - "hey, after listening to you, I know I'm never going to work that hard at writing. At this point, I'm just along for the ride. It's fun." He was still valuable to have in class as he was a skilled and helpful critiquer of other people's work.

There was the Starter. She had an idea for a novel but before she began the actual writing, she prepared and prepared. She had lengthy and intensive characterizations of all her characters. Not just things like height, weight, hair style and color, etc. but she plumbed their very psyche.

She had scale drawings of the interior of the castle. She knew the names of all the shops in the village. She had tentative chapter names. She had bullet-pointed plot lines. She researched the country in which her book took place.

Now all of this is great but at some point, you have to move on and actually write the book. So far as I know, she never did. She liked the planning more than the writing.

Then there was the Perfectionist. She wrote her first paragraph 27 times but she could never get it exactly right and until she did, she could not proceed.

"Just keep going," I told her, "you can always come back and edit it later."

But it simply wasn't in her nature. That particular course was part of a writer's conference. It was a five-day workshop. She was still writing her first paragraph when it ended.

The Non-Editor. Many writer's have these tendencies, including me. Once the original piece is done, we want to move on to something new but no, you can't do that if you actually expect to become a selling writer. You have to re-read and smooth out. You have to remove superfluous words or maybe add an adjective here or there. You know what your heroine looks like but does your reader?  You have to make sure you don't have grammar errors or misspellings. This is as much a part of writing as the original creation of a manuscript. It's the boring part for most of us but it has to be done.

We also have the Never-Send-Anything-Outers. I met one of my best friends at a Writer's Group some of my students started. She had, and still has, real talent as a writer, maybe more than any of us. The rest of us couldn't wait to hear the next excerpt of her book each week. We all encouraged her, especially me. She finished her book but I don't think she ever tried sending the manuscript to publishers. Then she wrote another book and it was just as good. It never got sent out either. I have never understood her mental block about trying to sell her work. Many writers have a fear of rejection so maybe that's it. Heck, I've had things rejected hundreds of times. I just figured the editors who sent them back were stupid and I persevered!

And now, of course, unlike back then, you have the option of e-publishing your own book through Amazon and/or Smashwords.

And one word about blogging before I go. Naturally, we'd never heard of blogging all those years ago. I write four blogs. I've known several people who started blogs and after the first couple, they just gave up. You must update your blog consistently if you expect readers to follow you.

The creativity of bringing something out of nothing is the satisfying part but it takes follow-through to do anything more with it.


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