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Monday, December 25, 2017

Give Me a Multi-book Series

            The Little Colonel (Illustrated Edition)                                   

I hardly ever read a stand-alone book anymore. Maybe it is old age but I prefer series in which the characters are already tried and true and beloved. I pre-order my favorite authors as soon as you can do so.

The first series I ever remember being in love with was The Little Colonel books by Annie Fellows Johnston. I think there were sixteen of them and I'm sure I had them all. I know they'd sound dated and unrealistic now but back then, I thought the Little Colonel was the height of class. I remember practicing talking with a southern accent because it sounded to elegant.

I moved on to animals after that with The Sunnybank Collies (Albert Payson Terhune) and The Black Stallion (Walter Farley).

Next was Mazo de la Roche's Jalna series and then the 87th Precinct books by Ed McBain. Although I read the first of them long ago, my very favorite series is still probably the Burke series by Andrew Vachss.

Some authors have a force that can draw me in no matter what the subject matter is. For instance, I read everything by Iain Banks or Iain M Banks - the middle initial denotes a science fiction book. He's now deceased but he wrote a mainstream novel every other year and a scifi in the between years. I have never been a science fiction fan but Iain M Banks made me love his SF just by the force of his style and wit. The books don't include the same characters but they all involve the same planetary location - the Culture.

On the other hand, although I adore Harlen Coben's books that feature Myron Bolitar and his fascinating sidekick, Win Lockwood III, I never read the novels that aren't about these characters. I just skip his non-Myron books.

I love Larry McMurtry's novels but only the ones that take place in the past, not the modern ones. I think Lonesome Dove will always be on my Top Five Books of all time.

Most of my favorite books tend to be about private eyes, cops, assassins and spies. They are usually graphic and gritty. I don't think I've read a book with a female protagonist since The Little Colonel. 

In recent years, I have fallen in love with Diana Gabaldon's fat Outlander books.though I put off reading them for several years because I didn't think they sounded like my cup of tea. (Claire falls through the Standing Stones right after the First World War and ends up in the 1740's in Scotland, where she meets and marries that dashing Highlander, Jamie Fraser. Beyond Outlander, my other favorite recent character is Captain Nathaniel Blackthorne of the the Pirate Captain, Chronicles of a Legend by Kerry Lynne.

Here are a few others, I buy as soon as they are available:

The Jack Reacher series - Lee Child
The Eddie Loy series (Ireland) - Declan Hughes
Mark Greaney - the Gray Man series
Adrian McGinty (Ireland) - the Sean Duffy series
Mark Dawson - the John Milton series
David Stone - the Micah Dalton series
Daniel Silva - the Gabriel Allon series
John Sandford - both the Prey series (Lucas Davenport)  and the Virgil Flowers series
Charlie Huston - the Joe Pitt (Vampire) series
David Rosenberg - Andy Carpenter series in which one of the main characters is always a dog.

And then, of course, is my own series about Rafe Vincennes. Rafe is my altar ego in a way. He's a unique character, as much anti-hero as hero. 

I know as soon as I post this, I will remember some not listed here and think, "how could you have forgotten _______?" 






 


                               

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